#60: Giving Back to Animals and the A Guardian Angel Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s probable that most people would argue that animals deserve kindness, care, and love. Unfortunately, some fail to provide this to their pets, and the effects can be quite detrimental to the lives of many animals all over the United States. In a lot of low-income areas, some people fail to have the means to support the animals with which they live. In other areas, where pet populations of dogs or cats are rampant, it’s almost impossible to get a safe, stable home for every pet. Of course, people go through hardships too, but pets do not have the means to pull themselves out of trouble like humans do.

Animal Hardships and a National Struggle to Save Them

Organizations all over the United States find themselves struggling for resources and tools to help pets in trouble and need. There are far too many people who take on pets without the means to care for them, and rescue efforts can be limited in their reach and ability to help. It’s tireless and quite the effort, and also one that takes a lot of strength. For example, people who volunteer for organizations like these can sometimes run into a lot of unseen consequences, such as depression and anxiety, from seeing animals in states of physical and emotional stress.

Then you have the people who don’t just volunteer some of their spare time; some work for these crucial organizations for a living. It’s because of their efforts that hundreds of animals are rescued every day all over the country. Today, hear about the stories behind one of the country’s most vital organization

Selflessness and Philanthropy with A Guardian Angel Foundation

On this episode, hear Cindie speak with one of those vital organizations made possible by individuals who dedicate their lives to animal welfare. Donna Lagomarsino, Director of Special Projects for A Guardian Angel Foundation in Mobile, Alabama works with a number of organizations all over the country to combine efforts for the betterment of animals. Her efforts at A Guardian Angel with organizations like Red Rover, International Fund for Animal Welfare, American Humane, Best Friends, HSUS, ASPCA, Florida SARC and Lehigh Valley CART (PA) have made a profound difference in the lives of thousands of people and animals. Listen now!

Caught up on Social Dog?

Social Dog is a podcast for dog lovers, hosted by Cindie Carter. Cindie is the owner of Walks and Wags, a highly successful pet sitting and training center. With decades of experience with animals of all temperaments and behaviors, Social Dog is a podcast where Cindie shares her knowledge and experiences with incredible and informative guests. You can even read more about Cindie’s expertise in a free PDF, “Learn How to Introduce Your Dog to Another Dog.

The archive of Social Dog episodes are available online, as well as Apple Podcasts.

You can follow Social Dog on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as keep up with some of Cindie’s conversations on YouTube.

 

 

#58 Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs More Than Doubled in 7 Years

#58 Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs More Than Doubled in 7 Years

As a dog owner, it’s your responsibility to know what could cause harm to your pet. It’s easy to avoid giving your dog food that’s bad for its heart or body, but accidents can happen. In that case, it comes down to what you keep in the house, regardless of if your dog should be eating it or not. That’s why sugar substitutes, which are growing in popularity, are a hot topic right now in the world of dogs.

Sugar Substitutes to Improve Health, But Come with Concerns

With the rise in health consciousness surrounding dangerous ingredients in our everyday foods and meals, sugar has probably gotten the worst rapport. In a lot of ways, sugar is blamed for a number of rising health concerns because of its seemingly limited benefits. While it may provide a temporary boost in energy, it also can be tied to heart disease, diabetes, and other common ailments. Some diets, such as ketogenic diets or Whole 30, even call for the elimination of natural sugars, as found in fruits.

It’s no wonder then why sugar substitutes have become so popular. One of the most common substitutes is Xylitol. Technically, Xylitol is a sugar alcohol that mimics the sweetness of natural sugars. Xylitol carries a zero net carbs and does not raise blood pressure in regular use. While it may carry less of the common threats of sugar, it comes with its own set of risks.

Xylitol and Dogs – Why It’s So Dangerous

A reason Xylitol has become so popular as a sugar substitute is its lack of effect on human insulin levels. For dogs, that’s not the case, and in fact, it’s quite the opposite. When a dog consumes Xylitol, its body mistakes the substitute for actual sugar, causing the body to produce insulin. During this process, hypoglycemia, low blood sugar, and even death are common as the dog’s body fails to regulate the substance in the correct manner.

Even in small doses, a dog can become affected by Xylitol consumption. Just 0.1 gram per kilogram of a dog’s body weight can cause health complications that may result in death. In this episode, you’ll hear Cindie and Marilyn talk about what to do if your dog consumes Xylitol, as well as a better alternative.

Alternative Sugars that Won’t Harm Dogs

Swerve is a natural sweetener made from a collection of fruits and vegetables. With no artificial ingredients, it’s not only safe for your blood sugar and insulin levels, but your dogs as well. Of course, you shouldn’t be giving this to your dog, but it’s good to keep in mind what alternatives you can keep in the house that are dog-safe. Unlike a lot of other sweeteners, it’s not bitter and actually reacts to heat like natural sugar, making it easy to use in recipes.

Caught up on Social Dog?

Social Dog is a podcast for dog lovers, hosted by Cindie Carter. Cindie is the owner of Walks and Wags, a highly successful pet resort and training center. With decades of experience with animals of all temperaments and behaviors, Social Dog is a podcast where Cindie shares her knowledge and experiences with incredible and informative guests. You can even read more about Cindie’s expertise in a free PDF, “Learn How to Introduce Your Dog to Another Dog.

The archive of Social Dog episodes are available online, as well as Apple Podcasts.

You can follow Social Dog on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as keep up with some of Cindie’s conversations on YouTube.

 

#59: Dr. Cara Gubbins Inspiring Us to Connect to Animals, Nature and Spirit

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a dog owner, it goes without saying that we wish to be connected to our pets. In many cases, pets doesn’t even feel like the right word. Our dogs are family, and in many ways, help us through some of our happiest and most difficult times. There is something about the presence of a dog, or any animal for that matter, that calms humans. Some feel that the connection between humans and animals is spiritual, and Dr. Cara Gubbins works endlessly to explore that spiritual connection.

Connecting with Animals and Caring for the Spirit

Consider the role an emotional support animal plays in someone’s life. The animal does not simply cheer someone up; the animal calms, natures, and inspires their human to a better version of themselves. Dr. Cara Gubbins, guest of today’s episode, guides humans through the spiritual experience of communicating with animals.

A huge focus of Cara’s work is the gap between the body and the spirit. On a daily basis, we’re worried about things like bills, social plans, and even just finding the energy to carry on through the day. Through research and studies, Dr. Gubbins arrived at a conclusion that presented itself in a number of other works: animals have healing properties for the soul of humans. Bonding and connecting with an animal is one of the most pure sense of calm and connectedness we can feel. How is this possible? It comes down to animal communication.

Animal Intuition and Healing through Animals

Dr. Gubbins focuses on a lot of healing, spiritual growth processes in her work, but one area in particular focuses on animals and their ability to help us evolve. As an Intuitive and Pet Medium, Cara works to build a space for communication between pets and their humans.

Many pet owners would argue that their bond with their dog, cat, or other animal is more than an owner/pet relationship. Through her work, Dr. Gubbins not only provides channels through which humans can connect and communicate with their pets, but also use that bond to strengthen their individual willpower and drive.

Can I Work on Communication with my Pet from Home?

Twice annually, Cara leads online courses in living intuitively with pets. This isn’t just getting to know what your pet needs or wants. The process is about building inner guidance through the healing and spiritual properties of bonding with an animal. If you’re someone who knows something is holding them back, whether it be past trauma or fear of the future, then this course is for you.

Listen to the episode with Cindie and Dr. Cara Gubbins for insights on animal communication and Cara’s work. If you’ve never been quite able to explain the connection between you and your pet, this episode might answer some important questions for you. Plus, you can see how different techniques in Cara’s work contribute to better experiences with stress, anxiety, and day-to-day troubles.

Caught up on Social Dog?

Social Dog is a podcast for dog lovers, hosted by Cindie Carter. Cindie is the owner of Walks and Wags, a highly successful pet sitting and training center. With decades of experience with animals of all temperaments and behaviors, Social Dog is a podcast where Cindie shares her knowledge and experiences with incredible and informative guests. You can even read more about Cindie’s expertise in a free PDF, “Learn How to Introduce Your Dog to Another Dog.

The archive of Social Dog episodes are available online, as well as Apple Podcasts.

You can follow Social Dog on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, as well as keep up with some of Cindie’s conversations on YouTube.

 

 

Austin Pet’s Alive Shelter of the month

Austin Pet’s Alive Shelter of the month

Episode #37: “Shelter of the Month” Austin Pets Alive

By Elizabeth Lefelstein

In episode #37 of The Social Dog podcast, our host Cindie Carter brings on Katera Berent – Communications & Events Manager at Austin Pets Alive (APA) – in our first installment of our “Shelter of the Month” series.

Based in Austin Texas, the APA has become one of the nation’s leaders in the no-kill animal shelter movement – and has helped the city earn the title of the “largest no kill city in America.” Throughout the episode, Carter and Berent discuss what has helped the organization become as successful and impactful as it is. Starting from its inspiring origin story, to its innovative programs for both animals and animal welfare professionals.

Listen to the full podcast, here, or catch the recap below:

Origin Story

Austin Pets Alive started in 1997 as a small advocacy group simply trying to raise awareness about Austin, Texas’ homeless pet problem and alarming euthanasia rate in shelters. Which, at the time was nearly 90%.

Through the help of local veterinarians, city officials, and state legislature, the APA had transformed itself into a full scale animal rescue center and shelter by 2001. And by 2008, the organization increased the the city’s alive release rate (as opposed to euthanasia) to 47%. It The APA set an even more ambitious goal into motion: to increase the alive release rate at shelters to 90%.

Three short years later in 2011, the APA was able to double the city’s stats and hit its goal of a 90% alive release rate in shelters. Now in 2019, the alive release rate sits at 99%. The secret to their success is innovative programs it created from the ground up.

Read a detailed history of APA on their website.

Innovative Programs

Focus on high-risk animals

Austin Pets Alive hyper focuses on rescuing high risk animals from other shelters in the county, and bring them into their shelter for help. This included dogs that are/have:

  • Medical needs
  • Pregnant
  • Babies
  • Behavioral quirks
  • breed discrimination (e.g. pitbull mixes)

“The APA is a pioneer in the shelter and the animal welfare world,” Berent explained.

Types of help the APA offers:

The  most common reasons for pets getting euthanized at shelters is because of high medical costs or behavioral quirks. Through the help of volunteer marketers, the organization raises money to help pay for medical services and behavioral training for dogs up to  “average means.” Meaning what an average american household could afford. Examples of services include:

 

 

The APA also has a volunteer matchmaker service, between dog and potential owner, to make sure that both will be happy. They take into consideration things such as whether or not the family has kids, their home has hallways or stairs, and the preferred energy level of the dog. From these answers, the matchmakers can advise on which dog/owner pairings would be a strong fit.  There are 250 or so dogs onsite at any time, and the matchmakers know them all.

 

“Austin is very special. We’re very lucky to have the community that we do here. Folks that live here are so impassioned about animal. Animal is a top if mind topic for anyone in this Austin community” – Berent said.

Training and Conferences:

Austin Pets Alive partners with its sister organization, American Pets Alive to educate animal welfare professionals across the country on how to build resources to do the same thing they’re doing in Austin. They offer week long apprenticeships, as well as host an annual conference every  

February.

 

“We love sharing this education, and we’ve seen it work at other shelters. We all believe in it so deeply that were excited to share with everyone else…Our Speakers leave you so inspired,” Berent said.

 

Read a more detailed overview of their programs for dogs and people on their website.

 

Interested in nominating your city’s local shelter for an upcoming “Shelter of the Month” episode? Contact us at SocialDogExaminer@gmail.com today, with details on what makes the shelter so great.

 

Lastly, a thank you to our Affiliates:

The Dog Gurus

Better Bowl

Plantacea CBD

 

Everyone Has The Ability To Communicate With Animals-Even You with Dr Maia Kincaid

Everyone Has The Ability To Communicate With Animals-Even You with Dr Maia Kincaid

Everyone Has the Ability to Communicate with Animals – Even You!

By: Ballie Ward

On a recent episode of the Social Dog podcast, we were joined by animal communication expert Dr. Maia Kincaid, a pioneer in the field of telepathic animal & nature communication. Maia came onto the show with an exciting claim: that everyone in the world, regardless of who they are, has the ability to communicate with animals.

Not only can we all communicate with animals, but it’s actually quite an easy process. Maia clarified that telepathic communication with animals doesn’t require any special powers or genetic trait. In fact, Maia has over two decades of experience working with students and clients worldwide teaching them about this very thing!

Before I jump in to teach you how you can communicate with your own furry friends, it’s important to define what Telepathic Animal Communication actually is.

It’s actually quite simple – Telepathic Animal Communication is communication with an animal that doesn’t require verbal or physical communication. In fact, you don’t even have to be there in person with them.

Similar to talking to someone on the phone, Maia teaches people how to communicate and receive feedback with animals with nothing more than the heart, mind, body, and spirit.

What can you talk to animals about? Well, the options are pretty limitless. Just as humans share opinions, feelings, and chat about their day, animals can be quite similar. Your pets may be able to ask you about an activity they particularly enjoy (like running outside!), tell you about something that’s upsetting them, ask about their food, or provide general feelings or wishes on day to day life.

Or, they may even give suggestions about how you can be a better pet parent. Really, the choice is yours – and theirs. It’s whatever you find of interest or importance.

While you’re conversations with your pets won’t happen verbally, there are still clear signs that will let you know what they’re thinking and feeling. You’ll receive the information through your own senses – for instance, you may hear them talking in your head, or have a sudden and clear feeling that you know what is true for them. It’s also possible you might see images of something they’re thinking or feeling. For instance, if your dog is in pain, you may receive a clear image of where on their body they’re experiencing pain.

The benefits of learning how to communicate with your pets are pretty limitless as well. Besides the obvious benefit of being able to have a dialogue with your pets, it also allows you to better care for them by tapping into their wants and needs and being aware of their concerns or frustrations. Similarly, they can provide their own feedback to you in ways that allow you to better enjoy your own life!

So how do you actually go about initiating communication with your animals? In Maia’s classes, she lets the animals lead – because, as she says, the most important part of talking to your pets is not the talking, but the listening.

Before trying to dive right in and ask your furry friends what they’re feeling, Maia recommends creating a space for yourself where you can clear your mind and take a few breaths, similar to a short meditation. That way your mind isn’t cluttered by outside distractions. Then, when you’re ready, you respectfully address the animal you’d like to talk to and begin the conversation.

If you’re not sure where to even begin with the process, don’t worry – Maia offers a number of trainings (online and in-person) where she’ll teach you how to do this starting in the very first class! She can also communicate with your animals on your behalf if you’re struggling to get in touch with them and you’d like to learn more about what they’re feeling. To learn more about Maia’s services, visit the Sedona International School for Animal & Nature Communication site.

What would you ask your dog if you learned how to communicate with them? Or, better yet, what do you think they would ask you?

Keep up with the Social Dog podcast to learn even more about your pooch as we interview animal experts and advocates who share valuable insight on our furry friends. Heres a link to this episode, if you want to grab your ear buds. http://traffic.libsyn.com/socialdog/40socialdog022019.mp3